WSJ: Duggan seeks to end “exodus”

June 23rd, 2014

Noting Detroit’s 60 years of population decline, unique among the biggest U.S. cities, the Wall Street Journal last weekend explored Mayor Mike Duggan’s efforts to reverse the trend. Even during his first half year in office, Duggan knows his success on this particular issue could be a major factor in his re-election, the newspaper reports.

“The single standard a mayor should be defined on is whether the population of the city is going up or going down,” Mr. Duggan said in an interview at his City Hall office six months after he was sworn in. If he fails, he says he doesn’t expect to run in 2017 and win—marking the boldness of his undertaking, considering the long odds he faces.

Duggan’s first term, of course, has taken place with the city in bankruptcy. Emergency Manager Kevyn Orr controls the city’s finances and the police department, but Orr’s term is scheduled to be up at the end of September. Duggan has made public his enthusiasm, high expectations for himself and staff, and his energetic vision for the city.

These first six months of Duggan’s mayoral tenure have been full of headlines about cooperation with city council, blight removal, lighting improvements and a renewed focus on the city’s neighborhoods, the WJS reports. But like many city residents, advocates and observers, the newspaper is essentially asking the question “Will Duggan’s momentum continue?”

 Judy Washington, a 55-year-old project manager, toured an open house on a recent weekend. Ms. Washington said she thinks about leaving the city “all the time,” but stays because Old Redford shows signs of coming back and she feels a “sense of responsibility” to help the city revive. “I think the jury’s out,” Ms. Washington said when asked about the mayor’s plans. “We’ve been down this road before.”